Name Tag Timeline

They could be hidden in shoeboxes or at the back of a junk drawer. Each proudly showing a company or organization’s logo and text with your name boldly engraved. These mementos are name tags. Collected over time, the badges represent the little steps toward personal growth and the big firsts that change your future trajectory.

Do you have a badge from that part-time job at Blockbuster? Did you get a badge during the internship at an elementary school that confirmed you wanted to be a teacher? Perhaps you have a badge from working at the Honda dealership while putting yourself through graduate school. Every person has their own path in badges.

Explore some of the popular name tag milestones that shape our customer’s lives:

  • First Job

It could have been making pizza, waiting tables, or answering phones. Everyone starts somewhere. This badge was made with your name on it. The little restaurant brand that sits on the edge of those plastic name tags represents the time you received your first paycheck.

  • First Promotion

The small line of engraved text under your name takes on a whole new meaning with your first promotion. This part of your badge might have indicated that your role changed from “Customer Service Representative” to “Supervisor.” Maybe you became an assistant manager or finally moved to head chef. With each distinction comes more responsibilities and a sense of pride for moving up within your company.

  • Photo ID for School Orientation

Many people step across the threshold to college life with a photo ID bearing their school’s name. You have completed high school. You searched for a school that met your geographic, academic, and financial needs. You filled out the applications and got accepted.

With the snapshot, printed ID and lanyard bearing your university’s colors, you were ready to start a whole new level of classes and stage of life. You might remember your college photo ID as your pass to everywhere you went. It was always with you in the library, that dorm room, and the dining hall.

  • First Internship

 Before entering your field as a full-time employee, you might have started as an intern. Whether it was paid or unpaid, it was your test run in the environment where you hoped to spend the rest of your career. Sometimes, it’s an affirming place where you decide that this is what you are truly passionate about. For others, it’s a way to find out a path you do not want to pursue any further. Either way it’s one stop in your journey.

  • First Work Conference

When your company starts investing in your career development, it’s another time to celebrate. Progressing in your field is a big deal. As you head to the tradeshow, networking event, or work conference, you represent your company. You bring your expertise and business attire. With a magnetic badge protecting your professional clothing, you are ready to put your best foot forward.

  • First Job as a State-Licensed Hairstylist

Everyone who has put in the long hours to complete cosmetology school, studied for the exams and received their license, knows the hard work it takes to break into this field. And once you got a job at a salon, you found yourself on shampoo duty and shadowing other stylists before getting your own chair. When you’re wearing that blingy badge that shows off your name, it’s game on. You’re ready to build that client list!

  • First Day of Residency

There might be a photo ID or badge lingering in your stack of student loan paperwork. You might notice it each month when you go to pay off the debt that helped you get to where you are in your medical career. Becoming a physician has many critical phases and remembering the uncertainty and excitement of your first day as a hospital resident can help keep you motivated.

  • First Political Campaign You Volunteered for

Whether you dream of running for office one day or are passionate about your local candidate, being an active participant in an upcoming election can be inspiring. It is always interesting to remember the issues at stake and reflect on elections that were won or lost. Whatever the outcome, you hold on to the fact that you defended what you believed in and tried to make a difference.

 

Over the years, many of us store up a legacy of old name tags. If you gather them together to consider where you’ve been and what you’ve done, you get to see a timeline of your life. IDs and name tags aren’t just for showing our name at work or school. IDs and name tags often become keepsakes, reminding us of how far we’ve come and motivate us to go farther.

 

Ordering Name Tags: When to Save and When to Splurge

There are many options to choose from when ordering custom name tags. When purchasing name tags online, you should consider three key things: price, use or occasion, and who will wear the name tag. At NameTagWizard.com, we have many customization options and name tag styles. To help you decide when to splurge and when to save, we’ve laid out some of our best badges for each situation.

When to Spend a Little More on Name Tags

Are you purchasing name tags for executives and long term employees? You should definitely go the extra mile and order badges that will represent your top employees and your company in the best light. We offer full color UV printing on plastic and metal name tags. This allows you to feature color-matched company logos, plus you can add 2 lines of custom text for each staff member’s name and position. Our fancy name tags feature a beveled edge and frame that adds durability and style.

 

Certain businesses can afford to add sparkle to their name tags! If you’re ordering name tags for a salon, jewelry store, fun boutique or similar company type, order bling badges. Our rhinestone framed name tags are available with full color printing or engraving and are designed to highlight your staff members’ names with style.

If you have an important company event, trade show or conference coming up, our high-end name tags are your best option. These badges represent your company name and employees in a professional way.

When to Save Money on Name Tags

Other situations call for affordable or basic name tags. When hiring seasonal or temporary employees or heading to a company event, more affordable options are ideal. Our affordable name tags are still produced with high quality materials, but they’re marked at a lower price because they feature basic customization options.

You can order gold or silver name tags with 2 lines of text and your company logo for $7.95 per tag. (These are available in plastic and aluminum.) Our magnets add an additional $2.00 to each tag, but if you choose a pin backing, you can save more money. We also offer quantity discounts. Click here to order our $7.95 1″ x 3″ logo name tag.

If you’re looking for name tags for seasonal or temporary employees, our small 1-line name tags are the perfect choice. Make sure store associates and staff are represented with simple text-only name tags that feature their name. There are several color choices available.

Reusable Badges for Visitors & More

Looking to keep track of visitors to your campus or building? We have reusable name tags that allow you to easily write names and visitation times in dry erase marker or chalk. You can keep track of who is on your business grounds at all times by ordering affordable dry erase or chalkboard name tags. We can even customize them with your logo or school mascot!

 

Also, instead of ordering “Hello My Name Is” stickers each time you have an event, you can order reusable visitor badges. These are available in the classic red and white and will allow you to write and erase names for many uses. No more stickers to tear off and throw in the trash after they’re used.

Our Unique Name Tags

Also, see our unique offerings. We have leatherette name tags and cool shapes to keep your individualism and branding in place. For restaurants, boutiques, schools and more, you can find unique name tags for your staff. Our UV printing and engraving provides limitless customization options that will help you represent your company and employees in the best way possible.

Let Us Help!

If you have questions about our name tags, or need help placing an order, contact our Customer Focus Team now! We will be glad to assist you.

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Protecting Students’ Right to Privacy

As schools are implementing new policies using student photo IDs and digital IDs, there is rising concern that students, parents, and school administrators may not be aware of how these new IDs could make private information accessible to others. The changes in ID use and advances in technology may significantly infringe on students’ privacy rights.

Many schools, from kindergartens to colleges, require that students and personnel wear some form of ID at all times. There are various types of IDs available, including photo IDs on lanyards or clips, cards with radio frequency identification chips (RFIDs), and wearable devices that replace physical badges.

It may seem like schools are simply updating their ID policies and security systems. Using photo IDs provides another layer of protection to help prevent strangers from intruding on school campuses. Digital IDs track who is in attendance and allow students to make various purchases, such as lunches or school supplies. But although new IDs offer convenience, students, parents, and teachers may feel less secure knowing the increase in potential risks.

When a chip is a necessity to students – allowing students to enter dorms or buy food in the cafeteria – some might consider privacy to be jeopardized.

Setting Limits

Schools now are able to gather extensive data about attendees. With new IDs, institutions have access to more student information, such as photo databases, attendance records, and students’ physical locations.  But how much information should schools be allowed to collect about students? Are enough safeguards in place to prevent schools from sharing this information with outside parties?

Some limitations for using new technology are already in place due to Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) laws. FERPA laws are designed to keep student information, such as educational records and other student information, private. These laws prohibit third parties from accessing student information.

However, educational institutions are still able disclose certain student information. Schools can disclose information that it deems “not harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed,” according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Photo IDs

Student photos can be considered directory information, according to FERPA Guidance from the US Department of Education. A significant concern among parents is that directory information can be released to outside organizations without parental consent. Sharing this personal information is not considered an invasion of privacy.

Parents and students can choose to notify schools in writing that they wish to opt out of directory information disclosures. The question then becomes whether or not parents and students are aware that personal information may be shared. Are they aware that they have the right to opt out?

Online photo directories can pose problems as well. When student photos are used for IDs, images may be stored in an online directory. While school websites post policies regarding student photo ID usage, there is no guarantee that the policies will be upheld.

Additionally, even though there may be ways to further restrict privacy settings for these photos, students may overlook or not even realize that photos are part of an accessible directory.

Digital IDs

Apple recently developed student IDs that are part of wearable technology. These digital ID chips are stored in i Phones and Apple Watches. According to Edsurge.com, digital IDs will be used this fall at Duke University, the University of Oklahoma, and the University of Alabama.

With new ID technology, more information sharing is possible. The tracking used in RFID devices and wearable technology reveals specific student locations. Certain types of chips even have the capacity to gather information during times when students are not in class or even on campus.

The technological capabilities of digital IDs have even more potential for invasion of privacy. This type of data collection could be used to evaluate and predict student patterns and behaviors.  Some feel this closer look into students’ private lives is invasive, unwarranted, and even illegal.

Should every on-campus activity and location pattern be accessible to student institutions or technology companies developing these IDs? Or anyone else? Is an institution-imposed location or monitoring time limit enough to prevent schools – or third party technology developers – from accessing personal information regarding the physical location of each student?

Administrators, parents, and students may be unaware of how personal information could potentially be obtained when implementing new ID policies and procedures. While student safety may be the overarching goal for new photo policies and IDs with digital tracking, students’ rights to privacy and safety could be significantly threatened. Without the proper safeguards in place, photo database use and chip technology can be hazards to protecting student privacy and safety.

 

Resources:

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-06-06-apple-s-new-digital-student-ids-raise-questions-about-security
http://www.naceweb.org/public-policy-and-legal/legal-issues/ferpa-primer-the-basics-and-beyond/
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/mndirectoryinfo.html

Should Students be Tracked with RFIDs? The Pros & Cons of Location Tracking

There is no debate over whether kids should be kept safe at school. With growing concerns of intruders, shootings, behavioral issues, children bringing weapons to school and other dangers, there is no doubt school districts have to find ways to protect students on campus. However, how far is too far when it comes to school safety precautions?

Some schools have already implemented the use of RFID tags, and the idea of tracking someone’s location is far from new, but should this technology be used to track your kids? This post will cover the pros, cons, ethical concerns and the potential health risks of using chips to track students at school.

First, what is a RFID tag? RFID stands for Radio Frequency Identification Device. These chips can be placed in ID cards and clothing and they transmit a unique serial number via radio signal to an electronic reader at the school’s entrance.

What are the pros of using RFIDs to track kids at school?

  • Tracking students’ location on campus aids in safety, because teachers know whether a child has shown up to school or not.
  • Location tracking can save time each morning. Roll call is replaced by technology, which saves time for learning.
  • School funding is based on average daily attendance, and if a child is checked in with their RFID, they’re accounted for and the school will receive funds whether they are in their desk or not.
  • Location tracking can cut down on truancy. This technology makes it harder for kids to “fly under the radar.”

What are the cons of using tracking devices?

  • Many who oppose the use of RFIDs say that they treat kids like cattle, and that they’re unethical.
  • If the chips are not encrypted, it is easy to clone a card and impersonate a student, or to skip school by having a substitute card.
  • Where the use of radio frequency is pervasive, potential health risks are heightened.
  • Those who oppose student tracking say that it is all for financial gain, and that students are no more safe than they’ve ever been.

Some schools have gone as far as adding RFIDs to student clothing. Parents, administrators and other officials may argue that this is a good solution for smaller children, but for middle and high school students it is crossing an ethical line. Also, the tracking chips do not work off campus, they must be within readable distance, so once a child is no longer on campus, they’re not being tracked. For older kids who care about their privacy, this is good, but it has sparked debate about the validity of using RFIDs. Are they REALLY for safety, or for maintaining funding?

As far back as 2004, schools began using tracking chips. Although the use of RFIDs in schools is still uncommon, it’s not new technology and it may become more popular as school violence becomes more common. Many students are already being tracked academically and behaviorally with smartphone apps. As technology continues to quickly evolve, so will the potential loss of privacy. Do you support tracking chips being added to student ID cards?

Resources:
https://www.wired.com/2012/09/rfid-chip-student-monitoring/
https://www.texasmonthly.com/articles/can-schools-require-students-to-wear-tracking-chips/
http://www.teenink.com/opinion/school_college/article/612978/Problems-with-School-IDs/

Oval Name Tags, a Matter of Royal Importance

Getty Images Daniel Leal-Olivas from HarpersBazaar.com

Name Tags were a controversial topic for the public observing Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s attendance of the Royal Ascot. The Royal Ascot, an annual horserace with prominent attendees, takes place in Berkshire, England near Windsor Castle. The public eagerly watched this event as it was one of the earliest outings for the royal couple since their recent nuptials.

The Royal Ascot commenced on June 19th and continued until June 23rd. Anticipation for how the new duchess would behave and what she might wear superseded the excitement of which horse was mostly likely to win. While Accidental Agent, Poet’s World, Merchant Navy and Without Parole all had stunning performances, many onlookers focused on the duchess.

And just a bit of that focus centered on a name tag, the one tiny detail that was absent from Meghan’s off-white Givenchy dress.

What’s in a Name (Tag)?

Oval name tags are a familiar add-on touted by Royal Ascot attendees. While Meghan held her name tag in her hand, she did not pin it to her dress. The absence was notable as many members of the royal family typically arrive at this event with name tags pinned to even the most fashionable garments.

Royal expert Duncan Larcombe told BAZAAR.com that everyone at the Royal Ascot is given badges for security. Oval name tags are a helpful tool for designating who has access to a certain area, such as the royal box. The tags include someone’s title with inscriptions like “HRH the Duchess of Sussex.”

Daily life for the general public may not involve wearing fascinators and reclining in royal boxes. But name tags are still a staple at conferences, political events, parties and in the workplace. These indicators provide helpful information for ordinary events, such as a title, office department, and country of origin or military ranking.

Are Name Tags a Requirement for Royal Protocol?

Following protocol is a royal responsibility. It demonstrates propriety and the proper dignity that accompanies being a part of the British Royal Family. However, according to the BAZAAR.com interview of royal historian Marlene Koenig, wearing a name tag at the Royal Ascot is not required by royal protocol.

“Wearing [name tag] pins has nothing to do with protocol,” Koenig told BAZAAR.com. “Protocol is for official, diplomatic, state events, [including] where you sit, when you enter, etc.”

While protocol demands strict adherence to certain rules, wearing name tags is presented as an option for some significant occasions. Name tags worn for special events, like the Royal Ascot, can feature color combinations such as purple and white for royalty, or red, blue and white for Britain. A full-color name tag may represent a certain country as well as a company, organization or school.

Prince Harry & Kate Wear Their Pins

Wearing a name tag is not a requirement. The Queen herself abstained from donning one. Other royal family members fulfilled public expectation by wearing their tags, including Kate Middleton. The Duchess of Cambridge appeared in a white lace dress that, unlike the dress of her newly acquired sister-in-law, featured a name tag pinned over her heart.  Prince Harry was also observed sporting his upon his suit lapel.

Perhaps whether or not one wears a name tag is merely a matter of personal preference. Perhaps Meghan Markle was thinking of protecting her clothing. Maybe a magnetic name tag would have allowed Meghan to preserve her dress and participate in the same manner as the Prince and Duchess of Cambridge.

For your next big event, you may have an option of whether or not to wear a name tag. You may be wearing a fine business suit at a trade show, rather than taupe dress to meet Irish President Michael Higgins, as in one of Meghan’s more recent outings. As you make your choice about wearing a name tag, consider what members of the royal family have done in the past. Kate Middleton chose to wear a name tag and Meghan Markle refrained.

Are you a Kate or a Meghan?

Providing Acceptable Forms of Identification

Identification cards serve a variety of purposes. Many identification cards show membership to an organization, restrict access to a designated area for security purposes, and provide proof of identity. From a signed government-issued ID, like a Social Security card, to a photo ID, like a student ID identification card, each card provides differing levels of authority.

Photo IDs help with starting employment, opening a bank account, domestic and international travel, driving, renting or buying an apartment or home, purchasing cigarettes, alcohol or guns, applying for government benefits, obtaining a marriage license, test-taking, voting and more.

Providing a Valid Form of ID

The validity of an ID is often determined by the purpose for its use. Government-issued IDs are one of the most commonly recognized forms of acceptable IDs.

The primary types of government IDs include driver’s licenses and non-drivers ID cards, U.S. passports, U.S. military cards, and state or federal agency issued photo IDs. These IDs carry significant weight as each is issued by a proper authority and provides critical information such as photos, birth dates and full names. Certain tasks may require the use of photo IDs that also include a signature.

Non-photo IDs issued by the government include Birth Certificates and Social Security cards.

Getting a Photo ID

Requirements for photo IDs depend on what type of ID you need, such as a U.S. Passport, Driver’s License, state-issued identification card, student ID or work ID. The entity issuing the ID will have specific stipulations for what is necessary to obtain the photo ID. To obtain a government or non-government photo ID, some proof of identity must be presented before cards are issued.

Driver License application

Government-issued photo IDs typically involve filing an application, while student IDs and work name badges are provided when beginning classes or employment. The government has stringent requirements for providing photo IDs, such as requiring a Birth Certificate and Social Security card. For non-US born citizens, a U.S. Passport, Certificate of Naturalization, Certificate of Citizenship, Foreign Passport, US Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or Permanent Resident Card may suffice.

Using Photo ID Cards

A photo ID card includes an image of the holder’s face as well as a full name. To be recognized as valid, photo IDs must not be issued by the holder, but by a separate entity. Photo IDs may be issued by entities such as the government, a school, hospital or employer.  These cards are used for security, establishing identity and gaining access to designated areas.

Non-government-issued photo IDs used for voting include an employee badge issued by a municipal, county, state or federal government office, concealed carry of handgun license issued by the state, public assistance identification card, an identification card issued by an Indian tribe and current student IDs from accredited schools.

Using a Student ID as a Valid Photo ID

Many colleges, universities and technical schools issue students photo IDs to provide access to certain resources, allow campus purchases, secure facilities, gain attendance information and serve other functions. Student IDs can also be useful for tasks such as voting, test taking, traveling and establishing identity.

To be considered valid, Student IDs must be issued by an accredited school and current (not expired). The acceptance of the ID depends on the issuing body and the purpose of use. Student photo IDs are accepted as a valid ID for voting in some states, and for taking the SAT. In some situations, possessing just a Student ID will not provide sufficient proof of identification. For example, a student ID functions as only a supporting document for traveling and establishing identity, such as when applying for a U.S. Passport or starting employment.